Gefilte Fish Ratatouille

1 medium zucchini sliced thinly

1 red pepper diced

1 medium onion diced

2 cloves garlic minced

2 tablespoons canola oil

1/4 tsp pepper

1/2 cup Tuscanini diced tomatoes 

1/2 cup water 

2 tablespoons sugar

1 jar  Manischewitz Gefilte Fish, drained of broth. 

Prepare all vegetables by dicing thinly. Place Gefilte fish in sieve, and drain broth. Place vegetables into warm skillet with oil. Sauté until vegetables are tender, but not done. Add two tablespoons sugar and pepper. Add diced tomatoes and water along with Gefilte fish. Stir gently until everything is incorporated and fish is covered with tomato broth. Cover and let simmer for half an hour. Serve warm, but tastes great cold as well!

In university I used to need to work harder on some subjects and every Thursday night, I’d get together to study Engineering Static’s with a friend. This is where I learned about the amazing flavour of Ratatouille, and it’s a recipe that’s stayed with me forever.

Easy Mushrooms in Garlic Butter

There used to be this steak restaurant that served steak and beer and that was it. The only sides they had at the time were baked potato or mushrooms. You would walk into the restaurant and all you could smell was this amazing smell. Later, I learned it was the smell of their mushrooms sautéing in a garlic butter sauce that was filling the room.

Now that I eat only Kosher food, I still crave some things from the past and this is one of them. I think I’ve perfected the flavour and honestly it’s so simple. It’s always those easy things that end up being awesome.

Ingredients:

1 pint sliced fresh mushrooms, stems removed,

1/4 cup of butter

3 cloves of minced garlic

Place everything in a pan and stir on medium heat until the mushrooms are sautéed.

That’s it. Seriously. That’s it. I serve this with breakfast and if I want it with meat, I change the butter to a non dairy margarine or canola oil. The butter brings this recipe to the level you want though. It’s just so good.

-Chaya

Easy Couscous Salad

Couscous is an amazing pasta. It was developed in Israel back in 1950s when they couldn’t get rice. The roasted semolina wheat gives it a sort of nutty flavour. I love it. It’s so adaptable to so many dishes. It can be served hot or cold…as a dairy or meat side…and it’s super easy to prepare.

Ingredients:

1 cup roasted pearl couscous

2 cups boiling water.

2 tbsp olive oil

1/2 pint cherry tomatoes

1/2 red diced red pepper

1/2 red onion

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp Kedem Red Wine Vinegar

Lawry’s Seasoned Salt to taste

Instructions:

Place couscous in heated pan with 2 tbsp of canola oil and fry until couscous is coated and a bit translucent. Add boiling water to pan. Cover pan and simmer for 5-7 minutes. Stir every so often so it doesn’t clump. Take off heat and let sit, covered, for 5 minutes.

Empty couscous into a serving bowl. Dice onion, red onion, pepper and slice cherry tomatoes in half. Add to couscous. Add oil, vinegar and salt to taste. Serves 4.

Any questions…just give me a shout

Chaya

http://www.instagram.com/kosheriffic

Spinach and Mashed Potatoes

Mashed Potato and Spinach:

This is my go to recipe. Simple ingredients like potatoes, bodek (checked for bugs) spinach and cheese are my staples in my house. When my son was small, he loved it as his Thursday night milchig milk meal of choice because Friday nights for us are always so much meat.

5 medium potatoes

2 cubes bodek spinach

1 cup milk (homo makes it creamier)

8 slices white cheese

1 tsp butter or canola oil

1/4 tsp salt

Dash of pepper

Peel and dice potatoes into quarters. Add water to a medium sauce pan along with potatoes. Bring potatoes to boil and turn down to medium heat. Simmer for 20 minutes or until potatoes are soft when pierced with a fork. Drain but don’t rinse because you want the starch. Add the milk and butter or oil and mash. Microwave spinach and add to saucepan. Mix. Take slices of cheese and stir into potato mixture while they are still hot to melt the cheese. Add salt and pepper and stir once more. Makes 4-5 servings

(this recipe was inspired by a friend of mine in Toronto who taught me the basics about it and I took it and changed it up a bit. Thanks Mrs C Nussbaum!)